Last edited by Fezilkree
Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

1 edition of Summer schools in 1918 found in the catalog.

Summer schools in 1918

Summer schools in 1918

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Published by Govt. Printing Office in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Summer schools -- United States -- Statistics.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby the Statistical Division of the Bureau of Education.
    SeriesBulletin / Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Education -- 1919, no. 31, Bulletin (United States. Office of Education) -- 1919, no. 31.
    ContributionsUnited States. Office of Education. Statistical Division.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination42 p. :
    Number of Pages42
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18323379M

    For the next six months, during the summer of , influenza cases are rare and scarcely reported. Then, without warning, the issue intensifies. In September, 14, cases are reported at a U.S. The Spanish flu, also known as the flu pandemic, was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic caused by the H1N1 influenza A g about 15 months from spring (northern hemisphere) to early summer , it infected million people – about a third of the world's population at the time. The death toll is estimated to have been anywhere from 17 million to 50 million, and.

      Back at the Eckmans’ home, Shirley digs out a book detailing what happened to Chuck’s great aunt, Agnes Eckman Peterson, on Oct. 12, Pregnant at . The Rosenberg Library’s Galveston and Texas History Center contains publications and correspondence regarding the Spanish influenza. These materials prove the necessity of the city’s response. residents died of the flu and bronchial pneumonia in October and November , compared to zero deaths during the same months in and two. When the Norwegian vessel Bergensfjord steamed into New York City’s harbor on Aug , an unusual welcoming committee awaited on shore. The ship held 11 crew and ten passengers infected with a new and particularly aggressive form of influenza. On the pier were ambulances and health officer for the Port of New York, who immediately whisked the ill sailors to a city hospital.

      In his book, “The Great Influenza,” author John M. Barry tells the story of the deadliest pandemic in history. In early , the world was at war. The recruitment, training and transporting of troops from all over the planet to the front lines of Europe created a “perfect storm” scenario that enabled the explosion of a new strain of. S cience journalist Laura Spinney’s new book, Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of and How It Changed the World, details what she refers to as “the greatest massacre of the twentieth century. New York City approached the influenza epidemic by making use of its existing robust public health infrastructure. Health officials worked to prevent the spread of contagion by distancing healthy New Yorkers from those infected, increasing disease surveillance capacities, and mounting a large-scale health education campaign while regulating public spaces such as schools and theaters.


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Summer schools in 1918 Download PDF EPUB FB2

SyntaxTextGen not activatedReview: Flu by Gina Kolata This book begins by pdf the influenza epidemic that killed an estimated pdf to million people worldwide during the fall and winter of This particular strain of the flu was known as the Spanish Flu since it was first seen in the spring of in Spain.Because in the late summer ofthe virus mutated again, this time becoming far more contagious and more deadly.

The new strain of the virus developed a way of attacking the human body's natural defenses, causing them to wildly overreact, exhausting the patient and bringing on death. In November, local schools opened up again and a third wave swept through the ebook in December and January, In Charlottesville and Albemarle County, the last death was recorded on January Worldwide, though, the third wave was deadly and raged on until the summer of